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Posts Tagged ‘MoMA’

A scene from “Yes” on the left and Tilda Swinton in “Orlando” on the right

Always political, always experimental, Sally Potter is one of the most exciting filmmakers in contemporary cinema.  MoMA took notice this month and screened her masterwork, Orlando, which managed to launch both her own and Tilda Swinton’s career.  Based on the novel by Virginia Woolf, Orlando is a science fiction/fantasy tale of a gender-shifting character who gets to experience life both a man and a woman over a period of hundreds of years.  Potter’s body of work continues to broach radical topics while maintaining an aesthetic principle, which is one of the reasons I like her so much.  Even her film still (above, right) looks like a perfectly composed Jacques Louis David.

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Marina Abramović. Portrait with Flowers. 2009. Black-and-white gelatin silver print; photo: Marco Anelli. © 2010 Marina Abramović. Courtesy the artist and Sean Kelly Gallery/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, via MoMA

Marina Abramović has tested the limits of performance art by testing the physical and psychological limits of the human body. Acting as the primary object of her pieces, she has offered up her own body – her health, her safety, even her life – in the interest of innovative performance. Perhaps the most infamous piece was Rhythm 0, performed in 1974 in a Naples gallery. For this piece Abramović stood, passively, in front of an audience and allowed them to use, or inflict, on her any of 72 objects in whatever manner they chose. Some of the objects were benign and some were deadly. The most malignant of those included an axe, a saw, and a loaded gun. By the end of the 6-hour long piece, Abramović had been cut, undressed, and had the gun pointed to her head. In reflection, the artist had this to say: “The experience I learned was that…if you leave decisions to the public, you can be killed.” In her latest piece entitled “The Artist is Present”, on view now at MoMA, Marina Abramović tests the limits of her sanity. Seven days a week, during gallery hours, Abramović will sit silently and motionlessly at a table and stare into the eyes of whichever museum-goer sits at the opposite end of the table. She will do this every day for the next three months until her exhibit closes on May 31st.

For more information, visit the MoMA website or view the live video feed during museum hours.

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Ah, the holidays are here. Forget about jingling all the way and boughs of holly. For me, nothing says ’tis the season quite like master of the macabre, Tim Burton. And how excited am I that he will be exhibiting a collection of work at MoMA New York that will open on November 22nd? His ghoulish characters and whimsical tales have entertained audiences for decades. This exhibit will provide fans with a rare opportunity to view works of art conceived of by the artist during the creation of his films, some never before seen. If you’re like me and too strapped for cash to view the exhibit in person, MoMa is offering a sneak peek of the installation via their Flickr page.

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