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Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Paddy Johnson of Art Fag City is several days and a several hundred dollars away from her reaching her Kickstarter goal of raising $10,000 to produce a distinctive sound project. The Sound of Art is a DJ Battle Record which pits the sounds of art works exhibited in Manhattan (Side A) against those in Brooklyn (Side B). She’s throwing in some really amazing kickbacks to those who are able to donate anywhere from $10 and up. If it were me, I’d go for the $500 pledge and have dinner with her and William Powhida. How fun would that be? Too bad I don’t live in NYC…or have $500. But for a mere $20 you can nab a copy of the record and do something good for the arts. Who can complain about that!

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From left, Kiki Smith's Untitled (Bowed Woman), 1995; Jeff Koons's One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank, 1985. (Photo: Benoit Pailley) via New York Magazine

“Skin Fruit: Selections from the Dakis Joannou Collection” is the current New Museum exhibition curated by Jeff Koons that’s causing quite a stir in the art world. The show screams of quid pro quo favors and clubby relationships, and for good reason. Not only are Koons and Joannou have a famous friendship with Joannou being one of Koons’ biggest collectors, but Joannou is also a trustee for the New Museum. Behind-the-scenes back-and-forth aside, is the show itself any good? Famous art critic Jerry Saltz gives a take worth taking into consideration in his New York Magazine review. To sum it up, I chose this quote by Saltz:

“The art world has not embraced the show (to put it mildly), and here’s why. In playing to its largest audience to date, the New Museum is not only pandering, but trying to trump the competition with the undeclared game of “collect the collector.” At the show’s core is a distorted and depressing reality: Joannou’s collection is drawn from a tiny slice of the art world—the superrich, the super-hyped and the supermale. (Barely a quarter of the work is by women.) It includes far too many famous artists who sell to major collectors for vast sums. It’s a history of the winners of one particular game—a narrative that’s simultaneously blinkered, elitist, and annoying.”

Be sure to read the full article here.

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Marina Abramović. Portrait with Flowers. 2009. Black-and-white gelatin silver print; photo: Marco Anelli. © 2010 Marina Abramović. Courtesy the artist and Sean Kelly Gallery/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, via MoMA

Marina Abramović has tested the limits of performance art by testing the physical and psychological limits of the human body. Acting as the primary object of her pieces, she has offered up her own body – her health, her safety, even her life – in the interest of innovative performance. Perhaps the most infamous piece was Rhythm 0, performed in 1974 in a Naples gallery. For this piece Abramović stood, passively, in front of an audience and allowed them to use, or inflict, on her any of 72 objects in whatever manner they chose. Some of the objects were benign and some were deadly. The most malignant of those included an axe, a saw, and a loaded gun. By the end of the 6-hour long piece, Abramović had been cut, undressed, and had the gun pointed to her head. In reflection, the artist had this to say: “The experience I learned was that…if you leave decisions to the public, you can be killed.” In her latest piece entitled “The Artist is Present”, on view now at MoMA, Marina Abramović tests the limits of her sanity. Seven days a week, during gallery hours, Abramović will sit silently and motionlessly at a table and stare into the eyes of whichever museum-goer sits at the opposite end of the table. She will do this every day for the next three months until her exhibit closes on May 31st.

For more information, visit the MoMA website or view the live video feed during museum hours.

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Tired of your failed art career staring you in the face? Done with waiting for the napkin doodle market to pick up? Then this is the event for you. El Celso is hosting an art shred happening on Wednesday March 3rd at 2pm as part of William Powhida and Jennifer Dalton’s month-long project, #CLASS, going on at Winkleman Gallery in NYC. Art Shred is an on-site shredding service that will liberate you of those important works of art, meaningful love letters, and one-of-a-kind photographs that your soul is just begging to be freed from. Think of it as eliminating the “skinny” clothes from your closet, those “what if” articles from your past, and embracing the full-bodied “you” of the present. Ahhhh. Feels good don’t it?

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Aurel Schmidt "Tiny Vices"

I said goddamn! This is so epic. Glad to see the talented Aurel Schmidt made it to the Whitney Biennial. There may be hope for art after all.

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Scott Short "Untitled (White)", 2008, Oil on canvas, via Whitney

A quick tour around the Internet will procure a number of reviews on the recent opening of the 2010 Whitney Biennial. One of my favorite critics, Jerry Saltz, writes for the New York Times Magazine and does a fabulous and readable job of synthesizing the experience. He begins his review saying, “After two biennials devoted to dealing with “failure” and “darkness,” this catalogue speaks of “renewal” and “optimism.” Yes, it’s the Obama Biennial: alternately moving and frustrating, challenging and disappointing—and a big improvement on what came before.” Read the rest here.

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Karl Haendel, "Diamond #2", 2009, pencil on paper, 90"x67" (via Harris Lieberman)

When the curator for NOMA Gallery shared the work of Karl Haendel with me, I was convinced they were photographs. Haendel culled the imagery for these intensely realistic, painstakingly rendered graphite drawings from personal and cultural sources.  The images are from his summer 2009 show with Harris Lieberman in New York City. Touching on American production, consumption and conservation, the work from this show served, in part, as a cautionary tale of these recessionary times. Simply stunning work. To view a selection of my favorites from this collection, follow the link. (more…)

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